HEALTH BENEFITS OF
QUINCE, SIDE EFFECTS
The quince is a relative of the apple and pear and belongs to the pome
fruit family. Quince is one of the earliest known fruits. For over 4,000
years, quince trees have grown in Asia and the Mediterranean. Today,
quince is also found in Latin America, the Middle East, and the United
States. The quince as we know it in the United States is a different fruit
from that found in Western Asia and tropical countries, where the fruit is
softer and more juicy. In colder climates, the fruit has a fine, handsome
shape, a rich golden color when ripe, and a strong fragrance, judged by
some to be heavy and overpowering.

One serving size of Quince (92 g, 1 quince) contains 50 calories, 0 g of
fat, 14 g of total carbohydrate (12 g of sugar), small amounts of vitamin C,
calcium and iron.

In the raw form, the rind is rough and woolly, and the flesh is hard and
unpalatable, with an astringent, acidulous taste. In hotter countries, the
woolly rind disappears and the fruit can be eaten raw. Because itÂ’s rarely
used in its raw form in the United States, the hard and dry flesh of the
quince turns light pink to purple, becoming softer and sweeter when itÂ’s
cooked. Because of the astringent, tart flavor, quinces are commonly
made into preserves and jellies. When prepared as jelly, it tastes like a
cross between an apple and a pear. Sometimes the quince smells like a
tropical fruit.

Selection

Select fruit that are large, firm, and yellow with little or no green. Quinces
should be picked when full-yellow and firm. Quinces must be handled
carefully as they bruise easily.

Storage

Wrap quinces in a plastic bag and refrigerate them for up to 2 months.

Preparation

Quinces are not eaten fresh because of their astringency (due to high
tannin content). Because of its high pectin content, itÂ’s particularly
popular for use in jams, jellies, and preserves. Quinces tend to hold their
shape, so they are ideal for poaching, stewing, or baking as a dessert.

Availability

This fragrant fruit is available September through January.

Potential Health Benefits of Quince

Chinese quince and quince phenolics may have health benefits on gastric
ulcer.

Researchers from Shinshu University, Japan, pre-admininstrated Chinese
quince and quince phenolics suppressed the occurrence of gastric lesions
in rats. [1]

Chinese quince phenolics may have health benefits of anti-viral activities.

Quince was found to have large amounts of hydroxycinnamic derivatives
mainly composed of 3-caffeoylquinic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid and
polymeric procyanidins. The antioxidant functions of Chinese quince and
quince phenolic extracts were found to be superior to that of chlorogenic
acid standard or ascorbic acid. And, Chinese quince phenolics showed the
strongest anti-influenza viral activity on the hemagglutination inhibition test.
[2]

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ZHION 2006. THIS ARTICLE IS FOR YOUR REFERENCE ONLY. IF YOU
HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU SHOULD CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR.

Reference [1] Hamauzu Y, et al, Antioxidant and antiulcerative properties of phenolics from
Chinese quince, quince, and apple fruits.J Agric Food Chem. 2006 Feb 8;54(3):765-72. [2]
Hamauzu Y, et al, Phenolic profile, antioxidant property, and anti-influenza viral activity of Chinese
quince (Pseudocydonia sinensis Schneid.), quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.), and apple (Malus
domestica Mill.) fruits.J Agric Food Chem. 2005 Feb 23;53(4):928-34.
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