horse chestnut side effects, horse chestnut benefits
horse chestnut extract horse chestnut vein strength , varicose veins August 16, 2011
Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) trees grow in northern India and Europe. Their nuts are shiny and
brown. Horse chestnut gets its name from marks found on its branches that resemble horseshoes.

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS
Horse chestnut is rich in saponins and flavones, while, horse chestnut seed extract contains beta-aescin and
many flavonoids. In most products, the extracts are standardized to 20% or more aescin.

CHESTNUT HEALTH BENEFITS
In the past, teas made from horse chestnut were used to treat diarrhea and hemorrhoids, and it was also
used topically on sores and rashes. Without much scientific evidence, horse chestnut is believed to have
benefits on people suffered from fevers and arthritis. Horse chestnut may also benefit people with swelling
and pain due to hemorrhoids, veins (phlebitis), varicose veins and other chronic circulation problems. It is
also said to have anti-inflammatory properties and be able to inhibit hyaluronidase.

Horse chestnut side effects
The excellent tolerability of aescin in the clinical trials indicates that aescin or horse chestnut extracts have a
definite clinical benefit in patients with clinical conditions resulting in chronic venous insufficiency,
haemorrhoids or peripheral oedema formation. [8] However, whole horse chestnut seed is different from
horse chestnut seed extract; the whole horse chestnut seed is believed to be toxic. Read the product label
carefully before use.

In general, horse chestnut extract is safe; side effects are usually mild and infrequent. [4]

The side effects of horse chestnut may include stomach irritation, nausea, vomiting and dizziness. And, you
may also experience symptoms like rash, itching, swelling, dizziness, trouble breathing may occur, if you are
allergic to chestnut. [5] Horse chestnut has anti-clotting activities, you should avoid using horse chestnut if
you are on NSAIDs, aspirin or other anti-clotting therapies. [1,3,9]

Approximately 30-50% of individuals who are allergic to natural rubber latex show an associated
hypersensitivity to some plant-derived foods, especially freshly consumed fruits. This association of latex
allergy and allergy to plant-derived foods is called latex-fruit syndrome. Chestnut has been associated with
this syndrome. The prevailing hypothesis is that allergen cross-reactivity is due to IgE antibodies that
recognize structurally similar epitopes on different proteins that are phylogenetically closely related or
represent evolutionarily conserved structures. Several types of proteins have been identified to be involved
in the latex-fruit syndrome. [7]
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RESEARCH STUDIES
Aescin, the major active principle from Aesculus hippocastanum (Hippocastanaceae) the horse chestnut
tree, has shown satisfactory evidence for benefits on chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), haemorrhoids and
post-operative oedema. [8]

Aescin Benefits - anti-oedematous, anti-inflammatory and venotonic properties
Aescin's therapeutic benefit is well supported by a number of experimental investigations in different animal
models, indicative of anti-oedematous, anti-inflammatory and venotonic properties, mainly related to the
molecular mechanism of the agent, allowing improved entry of ions into channels, thus raising venous
tension in both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Other mechanisms, i.e. release of PGF(2) from veins,
antagonism to 5-HT and histamine, reduced catabolism of tissue mucopolysaccharides, further underline the
wide ranging mechanisms of the therapeutic activity of aescin. [8]

Aescin Benefits - of Liver Protection
Aescin was found to have protective effects on endotoxin-induced liver injury, and the underlying
mechanisms were associated with its anti-inflammatory effects, up-regulating Glucocorticoid receptor
expression, down-regulating 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2  experssion, and antixoidation.
[Phytomedicine. 2011 Jul 27.]

CHESTNUT SKIN BENEFITS - BLOOD SUGAR REGULATION
Kanebo says it has found a way of extracting polyphenols from chestnut skin, which could then be used to
regulate blood sugar levels. [2]

HORSE CHESTNUT BENEFIT - ON CHRONIC VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY / platelet aggregation
Superficial thrombophlebitis is a common disease for older people. And, it affects more on females. If deep
venous thrombosis is involved, the typical medical treatment is heparin or low-molecular weight heparins.
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are needed to alleviate pain and inflammation, in some cases. If
concomitant chronic venous insufficiency happens, horse chestnut extracts from seeds and bark are often
used to support the therapy. [6]

studies showed that horse chestnut extract dose-dependently contracted both veins and arteries.
ADP-induced human platelet aggregation was significantly reduced by horse chestnut. A further reduction
was seen with the extract in the presence of ketanserin. In conclusion, horse chestnut contraction of both
veins and arteries is, at least partly, mediated through 5-HT(2A) receptors. Human platelet aggregation is
reduced by horse chestnut. [Phytother Res. 2010 Sep;24(9):1297-301]

Horse chestnut seed extract benefits
Horse chestnut seed extract may have benefit on chronic venous insufficiency; research suggests. [4]
Improvement in chronic venous insufficiency related signs and symptoms appeared in patients treated with
horse chestnut seed extract compared with placebo. Researchers assessed leg pain in seven
placebo-controlled trials. Six reported a significant reduction of leg pain in the horse chestnut seed extract
groups compared with the placebo groups, while another reported a statistically significant improvement
compared with baseline. Researchers also found significant reductions in leg volume in groups treated with
horse chestnut seed extract compared with placebo. One trial even indicated that horse chestnut seed
extract might be as effective as compression stockings at reducing leg volume. [4]

COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS
The general recommended dosage of extract is usually 500 to 650 mg daily, divided into two doses. The
dose should be equivalent to 90 and 150 mg of aescin. Once benefit is noted, the dosage can be
significantly reduced. People with edema should use horse chestnut under doctor's supervision.

Full Spectrum Horse Chestnut, 300 mg, Planetary Formulas
According to its label, the serving size is 1 tablet. Each serving contains 55 of calcium, 300 mg of horse
chestnut seed extract (standardized to 20% aescin, yielding of 60 mg of aescin). Take 1 horse chestnut
tablet, two times daily between meals.

THIS ARTICLE IS FOR YOUR REFERENCE ONLY. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTION, PLEASE, CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR
IMMEDIATELY. PUBLISHER WILL NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE ACCURACY OF THIS ARTICLE AND THE QUALITY OF ANY
PRODUCTS MENTIONED IN THE ARTICLE. ALL RIGHT RESERVED 2011 zhion.
REFERENCE
[1] Horse-chestnut, Vitamins Ultimate Fatburner Online Publication, October 11, 2005. [2] Kanebo testing chestnut
polyphenol for glucose lowering, Nutra Ingredients Online Publication, 04/10/2005 [3] Abebe W Herbal medication:
potential for adverse interactions with analgesic drugs. J Clin Pharm Ther. 2002 Dec;27(6):391-401. [4] Pittler MH Horse
chestnut seed extract for chronic venous insufficiency. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(2) [5] Latex-fruit syndrome.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2003 Jan;3(1):47-53. [6] Raake W and Binder M, Treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis
Hamostaseologie. 2002 Dec;22(4):149-53. [7] Wagner S, The latex-fruit syndrome. Biochem Soc Trans. 2002 Nov;30(Pt
6):935-40. [8] Sirtori CR Aescin: pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and therapeutic profile. Pharmacol Res. 2001
Sep;44(3):183-93. [9] Argento A  et al Oral anticoagulants and medicinal plants. An emerging interaction Ann Ital Med
Int. 2000 Apr-Jun;15(2):139-43.]
Horse chestnut seed extract is widely used in Europe for the management of chronic
venous insufficiency.