HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE LOWERING
HERBS AND SUPPLEMENTS
Green Coffee Bean Extracts
Chlorogenic acids (CGA) in green coffee bean extract (GCE) reduce blood pressure in spontaneously
hypertensive rats and humans. Researchers found no apparent side effects of green coffee bean extract
in dosing 28 subjects suffered from mild hypertension with 140 mg/day of the extract. [1] However,
long-term studies are needed to ensure the safety.

Garlic Extracts
In a of spontaneously hypertensive rats, researchers found both aged garlic extract and raw garlic extract
reduced the increased systolic blood pressure. However, researchers also found that decreased amounts
of erythrocytes and increased amounts of reticulocytes in the animals taking the raw garlic. [2] Thus, the
users should watch out the possible side effects of garlic supplements.

Ginkgo Biloba Extracts
Ginkgo biloba extract (Ginkgo) produced vasodilation via the nitric oxide pathway in aortic segments
isolated from Wistar rats. Administration of ginkgo biloba extracts did not change systolic blood pressure
in Wistar Kyoto rats, but significantly decreased systolic blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive
rats. Together with a few basic studies, researchers concluded that ginkgo biloba extracts enhanced
endothelium-dependent vasodilation and elevation of the endothelial intracellular Ca(2+) level in
spontaneously hypertensive rats, resulting in hypotension. [3]

In a study, researchers administered an extract of ginkgo biloba to stroke-prone spontaneously
hypertensive rats at 60 and 120 mg/kg each day for three weeks. They observed a suppression of the
age-related increase in blood pressure. [11]

Yeast Extracts
Researchers isolated a peptide fraction KRF814 from the hydrolysate of brewer's yeast and this KRF814
showed an inhibitory effect on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro. The researchers fed male
spontaneous hypertensive rats with brewer's yeast BY-G and KRF814; they found the systolic blood
pressure was significantly decreased in the rats. The active ingredients of KRF814, was about 60% of the
potency of captopril. [4]

Tomato Extracts
Tomato extract contains carotenoids such as lycopene, beta carotene, and vitamin E, which are known as
effective antioxidants. Researchers found that a short-term treatment with antioxidant-rich tomato extract
can reduce blood pressure in patients with grade-1 hypertension, naive to drug therapy. [5]

Bulbus Fritillaria Water Extracts
In a study of rats treated with NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester (high blood pressure inducer), Bulbus
Fritillaria water extract restored systolic blood pressure to normal level in rats. [6]

Vernonia Polyanthes Less. Extract
A rat study showed that oral crude Vernonia hydroalcoholic extract decreased arterial blood pressure
dose-dependently. During the study, researchers observed a significant rise in creatinine clearance and
a fall in fractional post-proximal sodium excretion. [7]

Green Tea Extract
In a study of isolated aortic strips of the normotensive rats, green tea extract greatly inhibited the
phenylephrine induced contractile responses in a dose-dependent fashion. Green tea extract at high
concentrations could be able to also depress the high potassium-induced contractile responses. On the
other hand, the key ingredient of green tea (epigallocatechin gallate, EGCG, 12 microg/mL) failed to
affect the corresponding contractile responses. [8]

C. Sativus Petals Extracts
In a study of anaesthetized rats, extracts of C. sativus petals reduced the blood pressure in a
dose-dependent manner. Administration of 50 mg/100 g of aqueous extract changed the blood pressure
from 133.5+/-3.9 to 117+/-2.1 (mmHg) in the study. [9]

Olive Leaf Extract
A specially prepared olive leaf extract (EFLA 943) has been shown for its blood pressure lowering activity
in rats rendered hypertensive by daily oral doses of L-NAME (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, 50 mg/kg)
for at least 4 weeks. The findings confirm previous reports on the hypotensive effects of olive leaf. [10]

Commiphora Opobalsamum Extract
The intravenous administration of 4 mg/kg of the aqueous extract depressed systemic arterial blood
pressure of anaesthetized rats by 20% and reduced heart rate by 14%. Pretreatment of atropine sulfate
inhibited the hypotensive effect of C. opobalsamum, suggesting its action was via the activation of
muscarinic cholinergic receptors. [12]

Clerodendron trichotomum Thunb
Clerodendron trichotomum Thunb. is a herb which has been used for treatment of hypertension in
Chinese medicine. Acute oral administration of the extract reduced blood pressure of spontaneously
hypertensive rats but not of normotensive control rats. [13]

Researchers have demonstrated the benefits of dietary flavonoids derived from the ethanolic extract of
licorice root against atherosclerotic lesion development in association with inhibition of low-density
lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in atherosclerotic mice. Furthermore, they found licorice extract
supplementation also reduced systolic blood pressure by 10%. [14]

Neem Leaf Extract
Intravenous administration of Neem leaf alcoholic extract resulted in initial bradycardia and then cardiac
arrhythmia in rats. The side effect is too serious, do not take this extract without doctor's
recommendation. [15]

Root of Bredemeyera floribunda Willd
The infusion of the dried roots of Bredemeyera floribunda Willd. is used in Brazilian popular medicine as a
potent diuretic for hypertension and nephrolithiasis (renal calculi). Intravenous administration of crude
root-extract (20-80 mg/kg) to anesthetized rats induces clear dose-dependent and reversible hypotensive
responses. However, it can lead to bradycardia and death at high doses. Discuss with your doctor about
its toxic side effects before taking this herb. [16]

Extract of Hibiscus Sabdariffa
Hibiscus sabdariffa caused a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure of the rats. [17]

Curcuma Herbs (Turmeric Curcumin)
Curcuma herbs have shown of blood pressure lowering effects and protective effect on the endothelium
in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The effects of C. longa, which induces only endothelium-independent
vasodilatation, while C. zedoaria, which induces both endothelium-dependent and -independent
vasodilatation in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The mechanisms probably involve a radical
scavenging effect and improvement of hemorheology. [18]
 
Yishenjiangyafang
Yishenjiangyafang is a prescription of Chinese traditional herbs used for renal hypertension. It reduced
blood pressure in a rat study. [19]


















REFERENCE

[1] Watanabe T, et al, The blood pressure-lowering effect and safety of chlorogenic acid from green
coffee bean extract in essential hypertension. Clin Exp Hypertens. 2006 Jul;28(5):439-49. [2] Harauma A,
Moriguchi T. Aged garlic extract improves blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats more safely
than raw garlic. J Nutr. 2006 Mar;136(3 Suppl):769S-773S. [3] Kubota Y, et al, Effects of Ginkgo biloba
extract on blood pressure and vascular endothelial response by acetylcholine in spontaneously
hypertensive rats. J Pharm Pharmacol. 2006 Feb;58(2):243-9. [4] Kanauchi O, et al, A yeast extract high
in bioactive peptides has a blood-pressure lowering effect in hypertensive model. Curr Med Chem.
2005;12(26):3085-90. [5] Engelhard YN, et al, Natural antioxidants from tomato extract reduce blood
pressure in patients with grade-1 hypertension: a double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. Am Heart J.
2006 Jan;151(1):100. [6] Kang DG, et al, Effects of bulbus Fritillaria water extract on blood pressure and
renal functions in the L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2004 Mar;91(1):51-6. [7]
Romanezi da Silveira R, et al, Effect of the crude extract of Vernonia polyanthes Less. on blood pressure
and renal sodium excretion in unanesthetized rats. Phytomedicine. 2003 Mar;10(2-3):127-31. [8] Lim DY,
et al, Comparison of green tea extract and epigallocatechin gallate on blood pressure and contractile
responses of vascular smooth muscle of rats. Arch Pharm Res. 2003 Mar;26(3):214-23. [9] Fatehi M, et
al, Effects of Crocus sativus petals' extract on rat blood pressure and on responses induced by electrical
field stimulation in the rat isolated vas deferens and guinea-pig ileum. J Ethnopharmacol. 2003
Feb;84(2-3):199-203. [10] Khayyal MT, et al, Blood pressure lowering effect of an olive leaf extract (Olea
europaea) in L-NAME induced hypertension in rats. Arzneimittelforschung. 2002;52(11):797-802. [11]
Sasaki Y, et al, Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) on cerebral thrombosis and blood pressure in
stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2002 Nov;29(11):963-7. [12]
Abdul-Ghani AS, Amin R. Effect of aqueous extract of Commiphora opobalsamum on blood pressure and
heart rate in rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 1997 Aug;57(3):219-22. [13] Lu GW, Effects of extract from
Clerodendron trichotomum on blood pressure and renal function in rats and dogs. J Ethnopharmacol.
1994 Apr;42(2):77-82. [14] Fuhrman B, et al,  Antiatherosclerotic effects of licorice extract
supplementation on hypercholesterolemic patients: increased resistance of LDL to atherogenic
modifications, reduced plasma lipid levels, and decreased systolic blood pressure. Nutrition. 2002
Mar;18(3):268-73. [15] Koley KM, Lal J. Pharmacological effects of Azadirachta indica (neem) leaf extract
on the ECG and blood pressure of rat. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 1994 Jul;38(3):223-5. [16] Bevevino
LH, et al, Effect of crude extract of roots of Bredemeyera floribunda Willd. I. Effect on arterial blood
pressure and renal excretion in the rat. J Ethnopharmacol. 1994 Jul 22;43(3):197-201. [17] Adegunloye
BJ, et al, Mechanisms of the blood pressure lowering effect of the calyx extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa in
rats. Afr J Med Med Sci. 1996 Sep;25(3):235-8. [18] Goto H, et al, Effect of curcuma herbs on vasomotion
and hemorheology in spontaneously hypertensive rat. Am J Chin Med. 2005;33(3):449-57. [19] Chen ML,
et al,  Effects of yishenjiangyafang on blood pressure and protecting renal function in RPH rats Zhongguo
Zhong Yao Za Zhi. 2003 Aug;28(8):746-51.
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